Last Week in Piracy: Week 8

Welcome to this weeks summary of news relating to Cyber Security, Anti-Piracy, Anti-Counterfeiting, Brand Protection and many other online security topics. In this summary we provide you with a selection of news items that we feel capture this week in terms of piracy and online protection. We provide you with a short introduction of a news item (written by the respective website); if you feel like you want to read more about a specific topic, you can click on the provided links below.

Developer found hiding malware in game as anti-piracy tactic

A developer admitted to targeting illegal users of its game by embedding malware in a piece of downloadable content — malware that enabled the company to access certain users’ personal data as a hedge against piracy.

Read the full story at polygon.com.

Bell, Rogers, Quebecor advance in piracy lawsuit against the operator of a Montreal website

Canadian cable and media giants won a small victory in their larger war against pirated content this week when a panel of federal judges backed their appeal in a legal battle against the Montreal-based operator of a website that makes it easier to stream video online.

Read the full story at financialpost.com.

Why more Australians are kicking the piracy habit

New research shows Australians are using piracy websites to illegally download TV shows and movies half as much as they were a year ago, as legal streaming services become more accessible. It is the first evidence to suggest a shift away from downloading pirated content since Australians were blocked from accessing about 60 piracy websites online, including The Pirate Bay.

Read full story at thenewdaily.com.

Blocked pirate websites used 50 per cent less due to court orders

In the past year there has been a 25 per cent drop in overall piracy in the year and a 53 per cent drop in the use of blocked sites, the Australian Site-Blocking Efficacy Report released on Wednesday by intellectual property solutions company Incopro shows.

Read full story at smh.com.