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Welcome to this weeks summary of news relating to Cyber Security, Anti-Piracy, Anti-Counterfeiting, Brand Protection and many other online security topics. In this summary we provide you with a selection of news items that we feel capture this week in terms of piracy and online protection. We provide you with a short introduction of a news item (written by the respective website); if you feel like you want to read more about a specific topic, you can click on the provided links below.

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App Publishers Lost $17.5B To Piracy In The Last 5 Years, Says Tapcore

Not all pirates say “arrghh” and wear eye patches. Some are smart, sophisticated, and technologically advanced. So smart, in fact, that they’ve siphoned off almost $18 billion in revenue from legitimate mobile publishers, says Tapcore.

Read the full story at Forbes.com.

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Hollywood studios score a partial victory in their piracy battle with TickBox TV

A U.S. District Court judge has dealt a major legal blow to TickBox TV, the Georgia-based set-top box seller that the major Hollywood studios, along with streaming services Netflix and Amazon, have accused of facilitating piracy on a massive scale.

Read the full story at LATimes.com.

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Canada’s Telecoms and National Media Want the Government to Block Piracy Websites

As the US dismantles net neutrality protections for the internet, a powerful group of Canadian telecom companies, cultural organizations, one labour union, and the national broadcaster are all lining up behind a proposal that would allow the government to block access to websites that illegally host pirated content within Canada.

Read full story at Vice.com.

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Piracy crackdown boosts China’s cinema sales

After stalling hard in 2016, the Chinese box office is back in gear. Annual ticket sales returned to double-digit growth in 2017, helped by new rules purging pirated movies from the internet, leaving no other option than to pay for new releases.

Read full story at Nikkei.com.