Last Week in Piracy: Week 13

Welcome to this weeks summary of news relating to Cyber Security, Anti-Piracy, Anti-Counterfeiting, Brand Protection and many other online security topics. In this summary we provide you with a selection of news items that we feel capture this week in terms of piracy and online protection. We provide you with a short introduction of a news item (written by the respective website); if you feel like you want to read more about a specific topic, you can click on the provided links below.

Hollywood’s first blockchain movie: an end to piracy?

A few years behind Wall Street, Hollywood is turning to the technology behind cryptocurrency bitcoin to distribute movies in a development hailed as the beginning of the end for piracy.

Read the full story at phys.org

Google removes ‘Kodi’ from search autocomplete in anti-piracy effort

Google has banned the term “Kodi” from its autocomplete feature, meaning those who look for information on the controversial media playback software will have to type out the full term in order to search, as reported by TorrentFreak. Google has been increasing its anti-piracy efforts in recent years, banning terms from autocomplete and making changes to its search algorithms in order to demote copyright-infringing material.

Read the full story at theverge.com

Piracy is the real competition says iflix boss

One of the biggest on-demand video streaming services in Southeast Asia said its main competition isn’t really other video subscription services. Sherwin dela Cruz, country manager for iflix, said that while they are competing against the likes of Netflix, Hooq and Hulu, what the company is really battling against is piracy.

Read full story at abs-cbn.com

UK government to crack down on piracy with new legislation plans

The UK government has published a white paper that outlines its plans to work towards tighter anti-piracy legislation in Britain. The new Industrial Strategy white paper seeks to aid the British creative industries against piracy, making it harder for people to download illegal content online, such as movies, music and books shared via free torrent files.

Read full story at theinquirer.net